5 Foods To Avoid To Combat Seasonal Affective Disorder

Why this resource is helpful:

If you live in the Pacific Northwest as we do, you know how 9 months of rain can keep you on the couch binge watching Netflix for days on end. While certainly acceptable in moderation, this can lead to Seasonal Affective Disorder; defined by the MayoClinic as a type of depression that"s related to changes in seasons. While a lack of Vitamin D certainly plays a factor, which we would normally absorb from the sun in the summer, there are many foods that can wreak havoc on your mood.

1) Added Sugars
Anything with added sugars will elevate your insulin and cause you to crash later in the day. Aim to get your sugars naturally through healthy fruits. Check ingredient labels, sugar hides in everything from your salad dressing to beef jerky. While better for you than artificial sweeteners, even natural sugars will cause a glycemic effect.

Common added sugars:

Cane Sugar/Syrup
Honey
Agave
Maple Syrup
Corn Syrup
Fruit Nectors
2) Artificial Sweeteners
Specifically, aspartame which has been linked to increased anxiety and depression. Artificial sugar and sugar alcohol has the same insulin response as regular sugar, but your body cannot process these effectively. This will often cause inflammation and digestive discomfort. Many manufactured foods use artificial sweeteners because they are lower in calories but still yield a sweet taste.

Common artificial sweeteners:

Aspartame
Sucralose
Sorbitol
Xylitol
3) Processed Carbs
Processed carbohydrates are usually stripped of fiber and nutrients making them easier for your body to digest, creating a high glycemic effect (insulin spike). In addition, they often contain a lot of added sugar that you may not realize.

Common processed carbs:

White Rice
Breads
Pasta
Flour

If you live in an area that experiences a lot of gray days you may experince seasonal affective disorder. Try avoiding these 5 foods to help combat it!
Quoted From: https://www.precisionptnw.com/blog/5-foods-to-avoid-to-combat-seasonal-affective-disorder/

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