5 Lifestyle Changes that Help with Your IBS

Why this resource is helpful:

There's no cure for irritable bowel syndrome, but with the right lifestyle changes, many people successfully control their symptoms and lead an enriching life
Quoted From: https://www.rosemedicalgroups.org/blog/5-lifestyle-changes-that-help-with-your-ibs

"Irritable bowel syndrome is the most common digestive disorder, but that doesn"t make it any less distressing. Roughly 10-15% of Americans are living with uncomfortable, recurrent symptoms like diarrhea, abdominal cramping, constipation, gas, bloating, fatigue and problems sleeping. These symptoms range in severity from mild to severe and can significantly impact your daily life. Find out how making some changes in your daily life can bring much-needed relief.

Follow a low-FODMAP diet
Though you may not have heard of fermentable oligo-di, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPS), you"re likely eating them. FODMAPs are short-chain carbohydrates that ferment in your large intestine when they aren"t properly digested. Beans, artichokes, and cauliflower are just a few foods rich in FODMAPs.

When bacteria in the large intestine break down and ferment FODMAPs, the process can cause abdominal pain, bloating, gas and stomach distention. People with IBS tend to be highly sensitive to FODMAPs.

Following a diet low in FODMAPs significantly reduces symptoms in people with IBS. Many patients find that symptoms like abdominal pain and bloating are much more manageable on a low-FODMAP diet. The diet is typically implemented in two phases. The first phase involves strict adherence to avoiding foods high in FODMAPs. During the second phase, foods are slowly added back in to assess tolerance.

Join a yoga class
Whether you"re sitting in bumper-to-bumper traffic, shuffling the kids to school, or crunching to meet a tight deadline at work, the stresses of everyday life can seem inescapable. For people with IBS, controlling stress is an important part of managing your symptoms. Stress commonly triggers or makes IBS symptoms worse.

The mind and body are intimately connected, and you have what"s referred to as the gut-brain axis. This refers to a two-way signaling relationship between your digestive tract and your central nervous system.

Yoga is one of the best ways to get your stress levels in check. In studies that compared yoga to a low-FODMAP diet, yoga is shown to be as effective as a low-FODMAP diet in reducing symptoms of IBS.

Patients with IBS can benefit from making yoga a part of their daily lifestyle. Yoga is a relaxing practice that involves holding certain poses and incorporates breath control and meditation. It"s shown to reduce markers of stress, particularly in lowering cortisol, which is a stress hormone."

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