Ways to Help Prevent Getting a UTI

Why this resource is helpful:

According to the NIH, about half of women and 12% of men suffer at least one urinary tract infection (UTI) in their lives. If you"ve ever had one or even heard about one you know it isn"t something you want.

At Rose Family Practice and Urgent Care in Vancouver and Battleground, Washington, our doctors urge you to come in for treatment as soon as you have symptoms of a UTI. In the meantime, minimize your risk for a UTI by adopting a few easy changes:

Change your sexual habits.
A UTI is caused by bacterial overgrowth in your urinary tract. Having sex can transfer bacteria from one partner to another, or from one part of your genital area to another.

Be sure to always shower or wash your genitals and hands thoroughly with a gentle cleanser before any kind of sexual activity. Urinating directly after sex flushes away bacteria that may have collected during intercourse. Wash or rinse gently after urinating, too.

Change your birth control.
Spermicides cause irritation to the male urethra that increases its susceptibility to infection. Men can wear condoms to protect themselves from spermicides (and protect both partners from sexually transmitted diseases).

You might also consider switching your birth-control method to contraception that doesn"t require spermicides. Natural methods, such as withdrawal and rhythm methods, require more commitment and aren"t usually as effective as other types of contraception, but they don"t use spermicide or any other type of chemicals or hormones to prevent pregnancy.

If you"re a woman, your OB/GYN can insert an intrauterine device (IUD) into your uterus that prevents it from building up the nourishing lining that a fertilized egg needs for implantation and growth. You can get an IUD that releases contraceptive hormones, or opt for a hormone-free version.

An IUD can stay in place for years without needing to be changed. An IUD is a reversible type of birth control, so whenever you want to be pregnant, you simply ask your doctor to remove it.

You could also opt for hormonal contraception, which can come in the form of:

Pills
Injections
Pellets
Vaginal ring
If you or your partner have frequent UTIs and are currently using diaphragms or cervical caps with spermicide, or contraceptive sponges, talk to your Rose Family Practice physician about what other methods might be right for you.

Uh oh. You "did it" again. You have a urinary tract infection, and now you feel like you need to go to the restroom all the time, nothing comes out, and you
Quoted From: https://www.rosemedicalgroups.org/blog/ways-to-help-prevent-getting-a-uti

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